First Impressions: Nissan Leaf Dominates EV Market, Touting Competitive Package

Introduced to the auto world in 2010 when gas hovered at around $2.78 a gallon, The Leaf was powered by a 110-horsepower electric motor, and a 24-kWh lithium-ion battery that had some performance trouble in excessive heat. Coming from an esteemed company that released the thrill-grabbing and high-powered GT-R just two years before, many out there were waiting for a bit more refined version, with a heightened sense of direction and prowess. Still, the Leaf then chiseled its novel claim as the industry’s first mass-market vehicle that put a strong hold on emissions, and fared well within its niche. The Chevy Bolt currently sits at around $7,000 more expensive than the Leaf, while the Model 3 sits at around $5,000 pricier.

The Leaf is still out there commanding its position in a landscape where watching the type of energy output is key, and when all is said and done, the Nissan price is over $6,500 lower. Its existence paved the road for vehicles like the BMW i3, Fiat 500e, and Tesla Model S, others wanting to stake their own position during a time when many were pounding statistics found about the deteriorating environment over and over in front of the eyes of consumers who at one time would never be swayed by electric. For 2019, Car and Driver claimed that the coming 2019 “Leaf +” model could have a range of over 200 miles, and a 60.0 kWh pack.

A portable Level 1 and 2 connector alleviates the need for a home-installed 240-volt hub station, and adapters for 120-volt wall outlets as well as 240-volt plugs are included. One common question from potential buyers is about the public charging stations: the DC quick-charging capability can replenish 88 miles of driving range in 30 minutes, gleaned from a public CHAdeMO connection. When using a 32-amp, 240-volt hookup, charge times are around 7.5 hours, and that can increase to up to 30+ hours when using power from a 120-volt wall outlet.

According to Nissan, the way the new Leaf is put together is designed to “fill the blank space” in qualities such as driving range, and large gaps in pricing points. Part of this blank space is the location right between the Focus and the Bolt. By bringing to the table an estimated 150 miles of range combined with a starting price of around $30,000 for a base level trim, it is sure to be a hit. The good folks at New York Daily News set out for a test drive in and around Napa Valley, CA, with the intention of seeing how hard of a push was needed to ultimately drain the battery.

The magazine staff was amazed at how conventional and familiar the Leaf feels in terms of new technology, and that it did not possess an uncomfortable and otherworldly vibe. Horsepower is increased by 37 percent, and torque output has risen 26 percent. Single pedal driving mode allows for acceleration, deceleration, and stopping of the vehicle by simply adjusting pressure on just the accelerator. If you opt for the SV or SL trim level, ProPilot Assist is a driver-assistance feature that adjusts vehicle distance, and steers semi-autonomously. Even if the large federal EV tax credits don’t continue at the same pace, the accessibility, handling, and range improvement should have many buyers pondering the ways that plug-ins such as the Leaf can be of “static and dynamic” value to the household!

The post First Impressions: Nissan Leaf Dominates EV Market, Touting Competitive Package appeared first on Home Business Magazine.

Source: Main home business mag

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