Has the Internet Affected Socialization? Interview with Developer Adrian Rubin

Adrian Rubin is a researcher, developer, and expert on the Internet of Things (IoT). He is fascinated with how data can move through a network without human input. People are becoming more familiar with the Internet of Things thanks to the popularity of voice-activated personal assistants and home automation. The concept also extends to such developments as RFID tracking, biochip transponders, and sensors built into today’s high tech automobiles.

Rubin has been developing new technology focused on helping IoT connected machines communicate better with each other. This will increase task efficiency and output. His determination is focused on making sure his clients receive the best possible performance.

Technology naysayers have long said that the Internet represents the death of traditional interpersonal relationships. Adrian believes this is short-sighted and overlooks the major benefits the Internet has provided in this area. He shares further thoughts on the subject:

Negative Traits

People who believe that the Internet has killed traditional socialization do have some valid points. People should not have their heads buried in their phones when they are interacting with other people. It’s rude and shows others that they are not important. Coming from a tech background, I have to be extra careful not to fall into this trap myself.

I believe that the best way to avoid this problem is to have cell phone free zones in your home, especially if you have a family. The dining room table should be the first place that is free of distractions. My parents always encouraged us to have family meals where we would share news about our day. I can only imagine what they would have said if we had all come to the table with our heads buried in some kind of technology.

I love sharing pictures and videos from my daily life with friends and loved ones, but it’s worthwhile to take some care when you’re doing this. Not every moment needs to be Instagrammed. The fear of missing out (FOMO) drives people to check social media and post obsessively. This is when something that should be providing a pleasant social communication between friends becomes a detriment. Just live your life, don’t be concerned with the curated version of it you’re putting online.

Positive Aspects

That said, the Internet has fostered so many positive aspects of relationships. My nieces and nephews can get to know their grandparents much better thanks to video chat and Facebook. They can virtually share in the excitement of games and concerts when they would only get to see each other in person every few months.

I know people who have met partners and friends online through mutual interest groups; they would never have met if it weren’t for the Internet. I have several of these friendships myself, and I am thankful I had the chance to meet them. Many of these friendships have moved from online to “real world” relationships, and we felt right away that we were close friends thanks to all the conversations we had shared online.

The Internet helps us build businesses and communities, not only with people we meet online but also with the people in our lives. I can’t tell you how many times my sister had praised the online “mom group” she joined when her kids were born. These moms live locally, but they don’t limit their interactions to weekly chats in person. They are there for each other 24/7 and talk about a wide variety of topics.

Recently, one of my sister’s friends had a serious illness, and the group was able to coordinate a schedule of who would visit them and when they would bring food. This interaction could have happened without the Internet, but the Internet facilitates it and brings it to its full potential. Sometimes all a person needs is a little fist bump of encouragement to keep their day going, and something as simple as a funny meme from a friend might smile at them.

Conclusion

How has the Internet affected socialization? I believe that it has helped people connect more than it has driven them apart. The trick is that people need to remember to connect in real life as well, and to try not to connect with others while, say, walking down the street or at the dinner table.

You don’t have to share every second of your life online, but it’s nice to have that extra level of connection with loved ones. Meeting new friends online is a revelation for people who have niche interests that aren’t shared by many people in their area.

I believe that the Internet can enhance socialization as long as it’s done with care and with some basic common sense.

The post Has the Internet Affected Socialization? Interview with Developer Adrian Rubin appeared first on Home Business Magazine.

Source: Main home business mag

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